home | login | register | DMCA | contacts | help | donate |      

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я


my bookshelf | genres | recommend | rating of books | rating of authors | reviews | new | форум | collections | читалки | авторам | add
fantasy
space fantasy
fantasy is horrors
heroic
prose
  military
  child
  russian
detective
  action
  child
  ironical
  historical
  political
western
adventure
adventure (child)
child's stories
love
religion
antique
Scientific literature
biography
business
home pets
animals
art
history
computers
linguistics
mathematics
religion
home_garden
sport
technique
publicism
philosophy
chemistry
close

Loading...


Notes

[1] Note that you may use an ordering that is a strict weak ordering but not a total ordering; that is, there might be values x and y such that x < y, x > y, and x == y are all false. (See the LessThan Comparable requirements for a more complete discussion.) Finding value in the range [first, last), then, doesn't mean finding an element that is equal to value but rather one that is equivalent to value: one that is neither greater than nor less than value. If you're using a total ordering, however (if you're using strcmp, for example, or if you're using ordinary arithmetic comparison on integers), then you can ignore this technical distinction: for a total ordering, equality and equivalence are the same.

[2] Note that this is not necessarily the information you are interested in! Usually, if you're testing whether an element is present in a range, you'd like to know where it is (if it's present), or where it should be inserted (if it's not present). The functions lower_bound, upper_bound, and equal_range provide this information.

[3] This difference between Random Access Iterators and Forward Iterators is simply because advance is constant time for Random Access Iterators and linear time for Forward Iterators.


Example | Standard Template Library Programmer`s Guide | merge







Loading...